3ECTS

The course offers a combination of criminological and socio-legal analysis of cybercrime together with a wider understanding of important cybersecurity issues. Initially, the course will focus on cybercrime and will provide an in depth understanding of the different types of cybercrime and online deviance from hacking and hacktivism to cyberstalking, online fraud and online piracy. During these sessions, we will discuss cybercriminal practices and techniques, relevant legal developments and practical challenges in terms of dealing with these crimes. Moreover, the course will look at the practical and ethical principles relating to digital forensic investigations that relate to the uncovering and prosecuting of cybercrimes and other crimes involving digital evidence.

Subsequently the course will focus on important cybersecurity issues such as organisational risk management and incident response mechanisms and will also offer an analysis of the phenomenon of cyberwarfare, which is has generated heated discussions in terms of attribution of cyberattacks and also regarding the mitigation of the impact of such attacks. Finally, the course will close with a forward-looking overview of the future of digital crime, as it will be facilitated by the development of the Internet of Things, where extensive interconnectivity of a multitude of device and the immediate processing of huge amounts of data will change the ways crime is committed and policed.

3 ECTS

Finance course represents the combination of two sets of knowledge: reading financial statements and decision making in a company. While holding its high ambitions to cover those broad areas during one course, Finance keeps its strong focus on the management perspective of the user of the information while keeping the high pace and intensity of the lectures.

The course starts with the basics of the conceptual framework of accounting and the preparation of financial statements: a balance sheet and an income statement. The course further develops the aspect of the analysis of the financial statements by adding the third financial statement- the cash flow statement as well as ratio analysis. The second part of the course shifts the focus on decisions the company is making on its financing as well as its new projects

3 ECTS

The part on international humanitarian law will examine the main principles and sources of IHL as well as its scope of application. At the outset, the course will examine the definition and scope of international humanitarian law, and then explore the lex specialis character of international humanitarian law in situations of armed conflict. It will further deal with the vital distinction between international armed conflicts, non-international armed conflicts and internationalized armed conflicts. The course will then examine the qualifications of laws applicable to each of the actors operating on the battlefield and address the principle of distinction between combatants and non-combatants. Further, students will get an insight into the practical aspects of conducting operations, namely, principles of international humanitarian law and methods and means of warfare. The course will end with the complex situations of detention and occupation.

The course will then examine the operationalization of international humanitarian law through international criminal law by discussing modes of responsibility and liability. The origins of international crimes will be presented, as will the core international crimes: aggression, war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide. Furthermore, the genesis of international criminal tribunals, including the International Criminal Court, will be covered, as well as modes of cooperation and complementarity between national and international courts and jurisdictional issues.


3 ECTS

This course introduces students to contracting in the information technology field. We will adopt a case-based and practical approach to exploring the fundamentals of how contracts are concluded; issues in cross-border contracting; main types of ICT transactions (distribution, licensing and services agreements); smart contracts and the Blockchain; non-disclosure and confidentiality agreements, IP waivers and assignments of rights, terms and conditions and privacy policies, contract enforcement. We will conclude the course with a contract drafting exercise.

3 ECTS

The course provides an overview of international and European human rights regimes, including the main standards and protection mechanisms. The course is structured in two parts. The first part introduces UN human rights system and examines the two Covenants and mechanisms for the protection and promotion of human rights. It discusses in detail selected economic, social and cultural rights, such as the right to health, as well as civil and political rights, such as freedom of expression. It then outlines the regional human rights systems, with a particular focus on the European system. Lastly, it introduces philosophical underpinnings of human rights and addresses some contemporary challenges to human rights.

The second part of the course focuses on the examination of the substantive human rights law, offering a comparative perspective involving a number of human rights protection instruments, with a special focus on the ICCPR and ECHR. It discusses the understanding of the obligation to protect human rights, including jurisdictional aspects and the application of human rights in times of emergency. Further, it considers such rights as the right to life, prohibition of inhumane or degrading treatment, or torture, the right to liberty and security, the right to fair trial as well as the right to private life, especially taking into account the contemporary challenges associated with armed conflicts and security threats. It also discusses the challenges regarding the compliance with the decisions of the human right judicial bodies and the redress to the victims of human rights violations.

3 ECTS

This course focuses on the analysis of commercial transactions, mainly contracts, from an international and comparative law perspective (see below Course Plan-Main Subjects). It is not based on the legal rules applicable to commercial contracts in one specific jurisdiction (domestic law), as this is more appropriate of nationally–oriented LLM studies, but on the principle that learning the law is not just about learning legal rules but also, and more importantly, about learning to think as a lawyer. Consequently, this is a course with a strong methodological component where students, in addition to having the chance to work with legal rules (mostly at a supranational level: EU, Int’l Conventions), will be given ample opportunities to learn about the legal problem-solving method at an international level. From this perspective, this course is intensively more practical than theoretical as students will have to read, analyse and discuss, first individually and later in the classroom, a number of problems and court cases representative of conflictive situations arising in the field of international commercial transactions (see below Course Plan-Sessions). Students will be provided with materials uploaded in the course intranet (more details on Course Plan-Sessions below) and will also receive recommendations on suggested readings and supplementary materials (see below Course Plan-Sessions and Course Literature)

3 ECTS

The course consists of four related parts. The first part introduces students to the basic notions of money, credit, interest rates, and financial markets. The second part focuses on banks, banking risks and regulation, central banking and financial system, in connection with money supply and demand. The third part addresses the institutional structure, goals, strategy and operating procedures of the European Central Bank. The fourth part is devoted to discussing the monetary policy transmission mechanism in the context of an open economy.

3 ECTS

This course focuses on the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP), which by its development throughout the treaties enhanced the EU’s global actorness. The CFSP is often approached as one of the most contested policy fields: some analysts speak about ‘diplomacy without state’, others argue that the Common Foreign and Security Policy is neither common, nor can it be called a foreign policy’. In the field, however, the implementation of the CFSP has resulted in a number of concrete missions conducted in diverse locations on the world map. These military and civilian missions, which fall under the Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) do not always receive extensive media attention, but they largely contribute to the EU’s status of International Actor.

Since 2016, the Common Foreign and Security Policy has received a new incentive with the new Global Security Strategy of the EU (EUGS). The permanent Structured Cooperation (PESCO), foreseen in the Lisbon treaty, was activated and 25 countries decided to enter in a structured and binding cooperation framework to increase and rationalize their defence spendings.  

In order to understand the dynamics of the CFSP, this course addresses three main aspects of the Common Foreign and Security Policy – (1) actors, (2) policy instruments and (3) actions.